The Latest: US Rep. Titus visiting Vegas polling place lines

Published 11-07-2018

0 Ratings

LAS VEGAS (AP) - The Latest on Tuesday's midterm election in Nevada (all times local):

8:50 p.m.

Democratic U.S. Rep. Dina Titus says she sees enthusiasm among people waiting in line to vote after closing time at several polling places in Las Vegas.

Titus said Thursday she brought a tray of cookies to people in line at the Boulevard Mall in her district in Las Vegas and visited with people waiting at Roy Martin Middle School.

She says ballot printers malfunctioned a couple of hours before polls closed at 7 p.m. at the school, but people in line told her they were determined to stay.

She described the situation to The Associated Press by telephone on her way to another delayed poll closure spot at Rancho High School.

Titus says the enthusiasm she's seeing by Democrats is an indictment of the president and the Republican agenda, from health care to immigration.

____

8:15 p.m.

The Republican and Democrat in Nevada's neck-and-neck U.S. Senate race are watching election returns privately before heading to election parties.

Republican Sen. Dean Heller's campaign spokesman Keith Schipper says the senator is watching returns with his family an

Titus says the enthusiasm she's seeing by Democrats is an indictment of the president and the Republican agenda, from health care to immigration.

____

8:15 p.m.

The Republican and Democrat in Nevada's neck-and-neck U.S. Senate race are watching election returns privately before heading to election parties.

Republican Sen. Dean Heller's campaign spokesman Keith Schipper says the senator is watching returns with his family and staff in a suite at the South Point hotel-casino in Las Vegas, where Republicans were holding an election night celebration.

Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen's campaign spokesman Stewart Boss said she was watching returns with her husband in a suite at Caesars Palace, where the Nevada Democratic Party was holding its celebration.

Election results were delayed because voters in line after polls closed were still being allowed to vote.

___

8 p.m.

8:15 p.m.

The Republican and Democrat in Nevada's neck-and-neck U.S. Senate race are watching election returns privately before heading to election parties.

Republican Sen. Dean Heller's campaign spokesman Keith Schipper says the senator is watching returns with his family and staff in a suite at the South Point hotel-casino in Las Vegas, where Republicans were holding an election night celebration.

Democratic Rep. Jacky Rosen's campaign spokesman Stewart Boss said she was watching returns with her husband in a suite at Caesars Palace, where the Nevada Democratic Party was holding its celebration.

Election results were delayed because voters in line after polls closed were still being allowed to vote.

___

8 p.m.

A mariachi band serenaded voters at one southern Nevada high school polling place where people were still lined up waiting to vote more than 30 minutes after polls closed.

Deputy Nevada Secretary of State Wayne Thorley said around 7:45 p.m. that voting was still going on for people in lines in Clark, Lyon and Washoe counties.

He says results should start to be released statewide around 9 p.m.

At some sites, poll workers had to mark the end of lines at 7 p.m. and began turning people away.

Officials say voting was steady and strong at polling places around the state, including 172 polling places in and around Las Vegas.

____

7:10 p.m.

Election closing time has come in Nevada with officials promising people lined up at polling places that if they arrived before 7 p.m., they'll be able to vote.

Deputy Nevada Secretary of State Wayne Thorley said Tuesday the process could delay the release of statewide voting results until close to 9 p.m.

Clark County elections spokesman Dan Kulin says lines had formed before scheduled poll closing times in and around Las Vegas.

Thorley says the same scene is unfolding around the state.

Extra-long lines also were reported at centralized polling places at shopping centers in Reno and Henderson.

Officials described election turnout as strong and steady throughout the day following two weeks of early voting that saw more ballots cast statewide than during the 2014 midterm election.

____

6:15 p.m.

Washoe County Registrar of Voters Deanna Spikula is reporting unusually strong turnout for a midterm election in her northern Nevada county that includes Reno and Sparks.

With less than an hour to go before the polls close at 7 p.m., Spikula says Washoe County turnout has now reached 66 percent.

That compares with 52 percent in the 2014 midterm election, and 79 percent in the presidential election in 2016.

Washoe County accounts for about 17 percent of Nevada's statewide vote. Clark County, which includes Las Vegas, has 70 percent of statewide active voters.

Democrats edged Republicans in early voting in Washoe County, 40.5 percent to 39 percent.

But 37 percent of Washoe County's active voters are registered Republicans, 35 percent Democrats. It's an advantage of more than 5,000 voters.

___

5:45 p.m.

The casino-resort on the Las Vegas Strip where Nevada Democrats are gathering has experienced power issues.

Caesars Entertainment says power has been restored at Caesars Palace casino-resort after it experienced intermittent issues Tuesday.

The alarms temporarily flashed in the ballroom where Democratic candidates plan to speak election night.

Caesars says it is investigating the cause of the outage.

___

5:20 p.m.

A Nevada state court judge says Republican party poll observers can remain inside polling places in and around Las Vegas until voters finish casting ballots, even if it's after 7 p.m.

Clark County District Court Judge Timothy Williams issued a temporary order Tuesday instructing county elections chief Joe Gloria not to prevent party poll watchers from seeing polling places close.

The order came in a civil complaint filed Monday by the Nevada Republican Party. It alleges members of the public were instructed to leave early polling sites during two weeks of voting that sometimes drew closing-time lines.

The GOP complaint was filed by attorney Ervin Nelson. It declares that the public has a significant interest in ensuring elections are open, free and fair.

Officials say anyone still in line when polls close at 7 p.m. will be allowed to vote.

____

4:55 p.m.

A Nevada election official calls polling place balloting "robust" following two weeks of early voting that saw more votes cast statewide than during the previous midterm election in 2014.

Deputy Nevada Secretary of State Wayne Thorley tallied about 190,000 voters statewide at about 3 p.m., after eight hours of voting with four more hours to go. That's more than 12 percent of the nearly 1.6 million active voters statewide.

That will be added to the 35.5 percent of Nevada voters - about 554,000 - who voted during two weeks of early voting.

In the 2014 midterms, 552,000 total votes were cast, or about 45.5 percent of eligible voters.

In and around Las Vegas, Clark County spokesman Dan Kulin characterizes voting as "steady and strong"

Officials say anyone still in line when polls close at 7 p.m. will be allowed to vote.

____

11:55 a.m.

Las Vegas voter Karla Kwist says a threat to families posed by changes to the country's immigration policies was a motivator to vote this year.

She told The Associated Press that the fathers of each of her two children came to the U.S. as immigrants when they were in high school, and she understands their "conquests and troubles."

The 57-year old child custody mediator says the rhetoric in Washington around immigration is meant to "stir up people" but doesn't offer solutions.

She says immigrants are not asking for handouts and are coming to America for "an honest day's work" and "willing to start at the bottom like any high school kid flipping burgers."

She voted for Democratic U.S. Rep. Jacky Rosen in the Nevada race for U.S. Senate. Kwist says Rosen has the "tenacity" to lead and find needed solutions.

---

11:45 a.m.

Independent voter Jerry Lamb cast his ballot for some Republicans this year but cast his ballot in the race for Nevada's 3rd Congressional District for Democrat Susie Lee.

The Henderson resident told The Associated Press he thinks Republican Danny Tarkanian is in the race "for the wrong reasons," and he doesn't know Lee as well but he thinks it's good to have more women in elected office.

The 72-year-old manager said he thinks women are "more reasonable" and he thinks they are better at working across party lines.

Lamb says he would also like to see Democrats take control of the House to provide a balance of power in Washington and some oversight of the Trump administration.

He says he doesn't want to see Democrats pursue an impeachment of the president but would like them to "put the brakes on some of the nonsense that we see."

---

11:20 a.m.

The Republican nominee for Nevada governor has voted in Reno.

Campaign aide Parker Briden says state Attorney General Adam Laxalt voted with family members at a polling place at Bartley Ranch Regional Park.

The Democratic candidate, Clark County Commission Chairman Steve Sisolak voted earlier at a middle school in Las Vegas.

Laxalt is the grandson of former U.S. Sen. and Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt and son of former U.S. Sen. Pete Domenici of New Mexico.

Sisolak hopes to become the first Democratic governor in Nevada in nearly two decades.

The next Nevada governor will succeed term-limited Republican Brian Sandoval going into the 2019 state Legislature, and will oversee redrawing congressional and state legislative districts after the 2020 U.S. Census.

---

10:05 a.m.

Alyssa Herman says she voted for Nevada Sen. Dean Heller because he's a Republican but he's also a moderate.

Herman is an unaffiliated voter from Henderson who says her views align more closely with the GOP but she wants to see politicians who can be bipartisan.

The 22-year-old nanny and university student said she likes the idea of smaller government and the economy is a prime concern for her.

She says she also voted for Republican Danny Tarkanian in the race for Nevada's 3rd Congressional District because she would prefer to see Republicans keep control of the House.

Herman says she hopes that if Republicans keep the House and Senate that they will be able to get things done.

---

9:40 a.m.

A 62-year-old registered Democrat from Reno says he voted for Republican Sen. Dean Heller last time and is "no fan" of his Democratic challenger Jacky Rosen. But Dan Lavely says he refused to vote for any Republicans this time around, primarily because of President Donald Trump.

Lavely told The Associated Press that the biggest knock against Heller was his flip-flop on health care.

The service manager at a big-box corporate retailer in Sparks says he's doing about the same financially under Trump as he did under Barack Obama.

But Lavely says Trump hasn't done anything to make his life better.

He says the GOP tax bill was a "total joke - a one-time thing" that had no impact on him. He has mixed feelings about immigration, but he says he doesn't want to build a wall or send 2,000 troops to the Mexican border.

---

8:25 a.m.

The Democratic nominee for Nevada governor has voted.

Campaign aide Grigsby Crawford says Clark County Commission Chairman Steve Sisolak went to a Las Vegas middle school local polling place Tuesday morning to cast his ballot along with his two adult daughters, Ashley and Carley.

Sisolak hopes to become the first Democratic governor in Nevada in nearly two decades.

He's running against Republican state Attorney General Adam Laxalt. He's scheduled to vote in Reno.

Laxalt is the grandson of former U.S. Sen. and Nevada Gov. Paul Laxalt and son of former U.S. Sen. Pete Domenici of New Mexico.

The next Nevada governor will succeed term-limited Republican Brian Sandoval heading into the 2019 state Legislature, and will oversee redrawing congressional and state legislative districts after the 2020 U.S. Census.

____

8:05 a.m.

Voting is underway across Nevada as polling locations open for Tuesday's midterm election during which voters will decide pivotal races for a U.S. Senate seat and governor.

The election also will decide more than 50 state legislative races, six ballot questions, whether Democrats keep two Las Vegas-area congressional seats and whether Republicans continue to hold such statewide offices as lieutenant governor, secretary of state, treasurer, controller and attorney general.

Nevada polling places can be found at the secretary of state's office website , and voters in Clark, Washoe and Douglas counties and Carson City can also go to any voting center location.

Polls close after the last person in line at 7 p.m. has a chance to vote.

---

12:05 a.m.

Nevada voters are set to decide pivotal races for U.S. Senate and governor, and now the only way to cast a ballot is in person.

Tuesday's election will decide more than 50 state legislative races, six ballot questions, whether Democrats keep two Las Vegas-area congressional seats and whether Republicans continue to hold statewide offices including lieutenant governor, secretary of state, treasurer, controller and attorney general.

Polls open at 7 a.m. and close after the last person in line at 7 p.m. has a chance to vote.

Election officials say voters should beware of misinformation. Ballots cannot be cast by text message, telephone or online.

Nevada polling places can be found at the secretary of state's office website , and voters in Clark, Washoe and Douglas counties and Carson City can also go to any voting center location.

No comments found. Sign up or Login to rate and review content.